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Best Foods To Boost Your Immune System

The  beginning of the year is always the busiest; and there’s no worse time to get sick! While a good amount of sleep, getting exercise, and keeping yourself hydrated are crucial, what you make in the kitchen is just as important. So we’ve summed up the best foods to keep your immune system strong and your 2022 goals running! 


Oranges and Lemons in a Basket

Citrus fruits

A main source of Vitamin C, citrus fruits like grapefruit, oranges, clementines, tangerines, lemons, and limes, are easy to include in your meals/drinks! They’re really effective in strengthening your immune system and in fighting off infections. You could also take Vitamin in C in tablet form, with the recommended dosages:

  • 75 mg for women (or about 1 orange!)
  • 90 mg for men (or about 1 and ⅓ oranges!)

 

 

    Button Mushrooms in Glassware

    Button Mushrooms

    Just in time for flu season, button mushrooms contain selenium, which prevents you from catching viruses! They’re also a source of riboflavin and niacin, both of which help keep your immune system healthy. There are millions of ways to add them to your healthy kitchen meals, too! 

     

     

    Acai Bowl Arrangement

    Acai Berry

    A well-known base for smoothie bowls, acai berries are rich in antioxidants that are an important part of a healthy diet. A diet that is high in antioxidants significantly reduces our body’s tendency of developing serious illnesses like heart disease and cancer. Bonus: they’re great for our skin!

     

     

    Broccoli in a Wooden Box

    Broccoli

    Broccoli is one of the healthiest greens among all vegetables, being packed with fiber, antioxidants, and vitamins A, C, and E. The combination of these nutrients supercharges your immune system! To get the most out of broccoli, health-wise, it’s best to steam them. 

     

     

    Garlic in a Glass Bowl on a Chopping Board

    Garlic

    If you love the flavour of garlic, you kind of hit the best of both worlds: it goes with pretty much any dish or snack and is valuable in fighting off infections and keeps your arteries healthy. 

     

     

    Yoghurt with Muesli and Berries

    Low Fat Yogurt

    Low fat yogurts are rich in probiotics, a good bacteria that helps the body against colds and flu! Yogurts are incredibly versatile,too. You can mix in chia seeds, granola, or fruits and have them for breakfast or a midday snack! 

     

     

    Fresh spinach salad in a wooden bowl with goat cheese

    Spinach

    Known as a “super food”, Spinach is packed with fiber, antioxidants, magnesium, and vitamin E. It keeps your body protected from toxins, viruses, and bacteria. Like broccoli, it’s best to keep spinach only lightly cooked to get the most benefit! 

     

     

    Almond in a wooden bowl

    Almonds

    Almonds are a good alternative for when you feel like having a snack plus they can add proteins to your favourite salad! Almonds have strong antioxidants, vitamin E, and healthy fats that support your immune system. 

     

     

    Hot green tea being poured from the teapot

    Green Tea

    Green tea is a strong source of L-theanine, which helps the germ-fighting compounds in our bodies. According to studies, it’s the best immune-boosting tea out of all types! It also keeps you away from drinking too much coffee which can be a good idea if you’ve been drinking a few cups per day.

     

     

    Cut up Kiwi

    Kiwi

    With tons of folate, potassium, vitamin K, and vitamin C, Kiwi supports your white blood cells and helps your body avoid infectious diseases. They go with both savory and sweet recipes, too! 



    To Conclude

    At the end of the day, when it comes to food, the best way to go about keeping your immune system strong is to have a good balance of vitamins, carbohydrates, proteins, and healthy fats in your diet. Read the CDC's tips to protect yourself against the flu as well to keep yourself from getting sick this winter!


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